girl’s empowerment

Zambian Girl Dreams of Becoming a DoctorLinda has wanted to be a doctor since she was five years old, which is when I met her. She grew up in Zambia during a time when HIV/AIDS was a silent predator about which no one spoke. A whole generation was lost because shame and self-blame insured that very few asked for help. They preferred to die. Hospitals were afraid to treat the sick and fear of contagion left them on their own to await death. Linda wants a top-level medical training to combat the stigma of this terrible disease and shed the light of compassion and knowledge into the dark areas of a community where every family has lost at least one family member to AIDS.
The AACDP is promoting a GoFundMe page to raise money for her education beginning with a SAT training course in Lusaka, the first step to qualifying for scholarships to the US and UK. Or you can donate right at this site with a note that the gift is towards Linda’s tuition.
 
https://www.gofundme.com/manage/a-dream-zambian-woman-doctor

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betty Abah girls rights nigeria

Unprogressive societies hold women down, says Betty Abah, the Joan of Arc for Nigerian girls and women. Betty Abah is (and I quote from the Daily Telegraph Newspaper in Nigeria) ” an award-winning journalist, author, women’s rights activist and founder of CEE_HOPE, a non-profit child’s rights and development organization.” She is a personal hero of mine, having dedicated her life to improving the lives of women and girls.

With her books he has tried to bring gender inequality into the public consciousness in Nigeria: The Sound of Chains, Go Tell Our King, among others. In 2014 her children’s rights focused journalism won her the Wole Soyinka Award for Investigative Journalism for “Child Friendly Reporting” and the list goes on and on.

“We must make child marriage history and this takes government’s sincere commitment and citizen’s action.” She talks the talk and walks the walk. Betty Abah wants to shed light onto some of our world’s darkest corners: the systematic disregard and mistreatment of girls and women.

Please look at her short documentary film on child marriage and the promotion of educating girls:

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:RUN.webm

 

betty abah girls' rights to education in Nigeria

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Two Semesters to Go

by Marsha Winsryg

 

tina school

My name is Tina Manda, born in Livingstone, Zambia, near the great Victoria Falls. I am 28 years old and come from a hardworking family of five. My mother is a single parent, and though it has not been easy to get by, she has always provided the basics for us.

I met Marsha through her work at the Mama Bakhita Cheshire Home where my niece has been a student for ten years. When I graduated from high school I entered several diploma courses (these were not official degree programs-MW) in business to improve my chances of finding a job. In the last three years I have taken purchasing and supply courses (purchasing and supply is the buying of products and services for the smooth running of an organization). With partial sponsorship from the AACDP I have managed to reach an advanced diploma. But I guess this is not enough.

My country’s economy is very unstable right now and people have to really struggle just to earn enough for food and shelter. Getting a job is not easy even with all of my course work and practicums. Most of the advertised jobs are for people with a degree.

I am a good student and been striving to finish my education for six years.
To achieve my goal I must complete two semesters more. My tuition and expenses cost $600 per semester, because I can live at home, so I need $1200 to gain a degree, and, I hope, a job. I will be qualified to work as a procurement officer, a stores officer and an inventory controller.

If I succeed in finding a job after graduating, my desire is to help others in my family continue in school and to somehow help the Mama Bakhita Cheshire school for disabled children that I have had a close connection to through my niece for ten years. One good job can make a difference in a family and even in a community.

If anyone can help me I will be so grateful.

Thank you and God Bless you.

Sincerely,
Tina Manda

If you donate to Tina with the AACDP donate button include an email to me, Marsha Winsryg (info@aacdpafrica.org), saying that this contribution is for Tina and it will go directly to her. You can also communicate  through email with her.Many thanks.

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Education Urgently Desired

by Marsha Winsryg

they aren't allowed to grow food for themselves on a farm!

stuck on the farm, and it's not even theirs...

This Zambian family lives on a giant plantation farm owned by a foreigner, who barely provides shelter and does not allow them to grow any food for themselves except corn and pumpkins. They are too far out in the countryside to be able to go to school because they cannot afford transportation.

Last year their oldest daughter, paralyzed from birth, died of malaria. The AACDP had provided a wheelchair for her, which she had never had before. After her death, we sent money for the family to grow a small field of corn and pumpkins. When I visited them for the first time last January, they proudly took me to their lush crop of corn, interspersed with pumpkin vines.

When asked why they didn’t grow other vegetables for the family, they replied that it was not allowed.

This policy cannot be legal, but wealthy landowners are not required to treat their farmers fairly.

Has not been to schoolin three years

Peggy

We want to find a sponsor for Peggy, who has not been able to attend school since sixth grade. She will need a tutor to help her catch up to her age group, and will need to board at a secondary school in Lusaka. This will cost about $1000 per year.

This is her only hope of climbing out of the cycle of poverty in rural Zambia.
We are small, we know the people we send money to. We know how to make sure the money gets to them securely and we monitor their progress, as can you. We take no part of your donation but support the AACDP  with craft sales and fundraising. You can email and write and receive letters and photographs.

Education provides self respect as well as sustainability, one child at a time.

See our sponsorship page.

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