Zambia

manu garden

Tuscan Tour Information Meeting and African Craft Sale

Saturday, May 14, 10:00am

My house: 20 Road to Great Neck, WT

508 693 4059

I will be showing slides and discussing three different tours  based in Florence, Italy: Florence Cultural Tour, Tuscan Artists’ Tours and Tuscan Sacred Sites and Sanctuaries Tour. These are offered every October and March. They are small, no more than 7 people, and organized to be rich for the senses without a stressful itinerary. It is my pleasure to share the people, food, art, architecture and landscapes that I love there. These trips raise money for my work in Zambia, the African Artists Community Development Project.

Directions:

Go to New Lane in WT, a short distance north of Old County Road intersection on south side of Edg-WT road. It has a sign with a white pony on it.

At 1/2 mile there is an intersection with three roads: 2 dirt roads,one on Rt., one straight ahead. Third road is paved road continuing on to the left. Our road is the straight ahead dirt road. There is a tree with many name signs on it, including “Karasik”, the biggest says “FISCHER”.

Go 5 or 6 drives to the left to sign says: “KARASIK/WINSRYG”. 508 693 4059 cell:508 560 2620

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Two Semesters to Go

by Marsha Winsryg

 

tina school

My name is Tina Manda, born in Livingstone, Zambia, near the great Victoria Falls. I am 28 years old and come from a hardworking family of five. My mother is a single parent, and though it has not been easy to get by, she has always provided the basics for us.

I met Marsha through her work at the Mama Bakhita Cheshire Home where my niece has been a student for ten years. When I graduated from high school I entered several diploma courses (these were not official degree programs-MW) in business to improve my chances of finding a job. In the last three years I have taken purchasing and supply courses (purchasing and supply is the buying of products and services for the smooth running of an organization). With partial sponsorship from the AACDP I have managed to reach an advanced diploma. But I guess this is not enough.

My country’s economy is very unstable right now and people have to really struggle just to earn enough for food and shelter. Getting a job is not easy even with all of my course work and practicums. Most of the advertised jobs are for people with a degree.

I am a good student and been striving to finish my education for six years.
To achieve my goal I must complete two semesters more. My tuition and expenses cost $600 per semester, because I can live at home, so I need $1200 to gain a degree, and, I hope, a job. I will be qualified to work as a procurement officer, a stores officer and an inventory controller.

If I succeed in finding a job after graduating, my desire is to help others in my family continue in school and to somehow help the Mama Bakhita Cheshire school for disabled children that I have had a close connection to through my niece for ten years. One good job can make a difference in a family and even in a community.

If anyone can help me I will be so grateful.

Thank you and God Bless you.

Sincerely,
Tina Manda

If you donate to Tina with the AACDP donate button include an email to me, Marsha Winsryg (info@aacdpafrica.org), saying that this contribution is for Tina and it will go directly to her. You can also communicate  through email with her.Many thanks.

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Zambian family kicked out of housing

What will they live on now?

In December of 2010 a man with a family of seven was illegally fired from his job at PAMA Meats where he had worked for eight years. The reason given was “growing corn in a restricted area”.

For eight years he had worked for the equivalent of $75 dollars a month in substandard  housing with his family of seven. There was not enough money to send the children on the bus to school. But at least he knew that at the end of his tenure he would get a nice benefit package which, after eight years amounted to about$3000. Then he was fired for growing corn in a “restricted” area. He protested that no one had told him of this restriction and that other workers were growing corn in the same area. He was given no thirty day warning, no fair hearing and no chance to present his side, as required by law.

This man tried to protest this unfair treatment to PAMA management and was subjected to cancelled appointments and misinformation. Even the Labor Office in Mazabuka, which is charged with helping poor and often illiterate workers receive fair treatment, upheld the PAMA Meat’s illegal firing procedure. He was never informed about his right to a trial at the Industrial Relations Court in Lusaka, or that PAMA had not followed proper procedure. In fact, he was encouraged to take his case to the local court in Mazabuka, which has no jurisdiction in labor matters. Even so, they too judged against him.

Their first house after his firing was an unfinished house with no roof. For two years the family has been surviving as best they can.

In March of 2011 the AACDP learned about the Industrial Relations Court and  tried to convince them that deceit and misinformation had been the reason this man had not brought the case to them when it occurred. But again, the court judged against him, saying he should “move on with his life ” because he will never get his terminal benefits or compensation for unfair dismissal. (Why not?) The judge further chastised him for spending his money on the case and “annoying” the court.??!!

He then went to the Legal Aid Board who advised that after all this time, evidence was lacking. Why PAMA’s provable illegal firing was not the important issue here was not explained. He was told that, should he appeal, all the legal costs of both sides would fall to him.

Is it right that a big corporation like PAMA should improperly dismiss a man after eight years, deny him what was owed, and face no penalty? Are the courts so uninterested in the poor? Why is seeking justice annoying?

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Sydney deserves a good arm

Seven years ago Sydney wrote to me about getting help with an education in business. He was able to earn his tuition gathering and shipping crafts from artisans in Lusaka to me here in the US. At this point he has earned several diplomas and is able to manage affairs of the AACDP in Zambia. I could not operate without him, and I could not have found a better, smarter or kinder man. In an email to me he said:

“While in South Africa working to improve the plight of the disabled there, I visited some companies that deal in prosthetics because I have always wanted one but finance was an issue. I thought I should ask Marsha to help me get it through some form of fundraising. It will help me in so many ways, especially employment.Most people think I cannot do certain things with one arm.”

The cost is about $1800.

Please consider what kind of gift this is. Donate  here or send a check for any amount to:

AACDP ,PO Box 3051, West Tisbury, MA (memo:Sydney)

Many thanks to the many kind people in the world.

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